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Nobel week 2015 October 5, 2015

Posted by apetrov in Blogroll, Physics, Science.
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So, once again, the Nobel week is upon us. And one of the topics of conversations for the “water cooler chat” in physics departments around the world is speculations on who (besides the infamous Hungarian “physicist” — sorry for the insider joke, I can elaborate on that if asked) would get the Nobel Prize in physics this year. What is your prediction?

With invention of various metrics for “measuring scientific performance” one can make educated guesses — and even put predictions on the industrial footage — see Thomson Reuters predictions based on a number of citations (they did get the Englert-Higgs prize right, but are almost always off). Or even try your luck with on-line betting (sorry, no link here — I don’t encourage this). So there is a variety of ways to make you interested.

My predictions for 2015: Vera Rubin for Dark Matter or Deborah Jin for fermionic condensates. But you must remember that my record is no better than that of Thomson Reuters.

So, you want to go on sabbatical… February 5, 2015

Posted by apetrov in Blogroll, Near Physics, Physics, Science.
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Every seven years or so a professor in a US/Canadian University can apply for a sabbatical leave. It’s a very nice thing: your University allows you to catch up on your research, learn new techniques, write a book, etc. That is to say, you become a postdoc again. And in many cases questions arise: should I stay at my University or go somewhere else? In many cases yearlong sabbaticals are not funded by the home University, i.e. you have to find additional sources of funding to keep your salary.

I am on a year-long sabbatical this academic year. So I had to find a way to fund my sabbatical (my University only pays 60% of my salary). I spent Fall 2014 semester at Fermilab and am spending Winter 2015 semester at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Here are some helpful resources for those who are looking to fund their sabbatical next year. As you could see from the list, they are slightly tilted towards theoretical physics. Yet, there are many resources that are useful for any profession. Of course your success depends on many factors: whether or not you would like to stay in the US or go abroad, competition, etc.

  • General resources:

Guggenheim Foundation
Deadline: September

Fulbright Scholar Program
Deadline: August

  • USA/Canada:

Simons Fellowship
Deadline: September

IAS Princeton (Member/Sabbatical)
Deadline: November

Perimeter Institute:
Visitors
Visiting Professors
Deadline: November

Radcliffe Institute at Harvard University
Deadline: November

FNAL:
URA Visiting Scholar program
Intensity Frontier Fellowships
Deadline: twice a year

  • Europe:

Alexander von Humbuldt:
Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel Research Award
Humboldt Research Award
Deadline: varies

Marie Curie International Incoming Fellowships
Deadline: varies

CERN Short Term visitors
Deadline: varies

Hans Fischer Senior Fellowship (TUM-IAS, Munchen)
Deadline: varies
Some general  info that could also be useful can be found here.

I don’t pretend to have a complete list, but those sites were useful for me. I did not apply to all of those programs — and rather unfortunately, missed a deadline for the Simons Fellowship. Many University also have separate funds for sabbatical visitors. So if there is a University one wants to visit, it’s best to ask.

On a final note, it might be useful to be prepared and figure out, if you get funded, how the money/fellowship will find a way to your University and to you. Also, in many cases “60% of the salary” paid by your University while you are on a sabbatical leave means that you would have to find not only the remaining 40% of your salary, but also fringes that your University would take from your fellowship. So the amount that you’d need to find is more than 40% of your salary. Please don’t make a mistake that I made. 🙂

Good luck!